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Blue Origin New Shepard 10 test mission launch: Why it's so important? -

Blue Origin New Shepard 10 test mission launch: Why it's so important? por ENGINEERING TODAY   4 semanas atrás

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BLUE ORIGIN NEW SHEPARD 10 TEST MISSION LAUNCH: A SCIENCE-LOADED CAPSULE TO SPACE

WHY BLUE ORIGIN NEW SHEPARD 10 TEST MISSION LAUNCH SO IMPORTANT?
INTRO

Blue Origin, the rocket company founded by Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, is about to undertake the 10th launch of its New Shepard launch vehicle, with its capsule chock full of experiments. The launch, which was originally scheduled for a month ago, but delayed for various reasons, take place on 23rd January at 6:50 AM Pacific time, from West Texas, carrying eight research payloads, including two built by a team of University of Central Florida undergraduate students.
blue origin new shepard launch
The NS-10 mission, named for New Shepard's tenth mission, was initially scheduled to launch last December, but a "ground infrastructure issue" discovered, a minutes before liftoff pushed the date back a month.
In this video, Engineering Today will discuss about Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket launch which take place on 23rd January. Why this launch is so crucial for Blue Origin, before fly with passengers to sub orbit?
So lets get started.
SUB-ORBITAL SPACE-VISITING PLATFORM
blue origin new shepard launch
New Shepard is a sub-orbital space-visiting platform, not a satellite-launching one.
blue origin new shepard launch
But it uses a very traditional method of getting to the edge of space, compared with Virgin Galactic’s, rather involved mothership-spaceship combo, which scraped the very edge of space in its fourth test launch last month.

The rocket shoots straight up, as rockets do, reaches escape velocity, then pops its capsule off the top, just before the Karman line that officially, if somewhat arbitrarily, delineates space from Earth’s atmosphere. The capsule, after exhausting its upward momentum, gently floats back to the surface under a parachute. That’s the plan for 23rd January launch.
blue origin new shepard launch
But instead of taking a dummy load or “Mannequin Skywalker,” as the company calls its human stand-in during tests of the crew capsule, mission 10 has a whole collection of experiments on board.
COLLECTION OF EXPERIMENTS ON BOARD

There are nine experiments total, all flying through NASA’s Flight Opportunities program.
The nine PAYLOADS scheduled for the New Shepard flight are:

Number 1: COLLECTION OF REGOLITH EXPERIMENT (CORE)

Number 2: COLLISIONS INTO DUST EXPERIMENT (COLLIDE)

blue origin new shepard launch

Number 3: ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS

Number 4: FLOW BOILING IN MICROGRAP COOLERS – Embedded Thermal Management for Space Applications

Number 5: MICROGRAVITY PROPELLANT GAUGING Using Modal Analysis

Number 6: SUBORBITAL FLIGHT EXPERIMENT MONITOR-2

Number 7: VALIDATING TELEMETRIC IMAGING HARDWARE for Crew-Assisted, and Crew-Autonomous Biological Imaging in Suborbital Applications
blue origin new shepard launch
Number 8: VIBRATION ISOLATION PLATFORM (VIP)

And Number 9: ZERO-GRAVITY GREEN PROPELLANT MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY
This experiment will mature technology to control nontoxic green fuels in spacecraft propellant tanks. This technology complements NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission, and could benefit future missions to near and deep space.
IMPORTANCE OF EXPERIMENTAL REPETITION

Most have already been up in other vehicles or even a Blue Origin one, but obviously repetition and iteration is important to their development.
“The opportunity to re-fly our payload is helping us not only validate and compare data for different flight profiles, but also test modifications and upgrades,” said NASA’s Kathryn Hurlbert, who heads up the Suborbital Flight Experiment Monitor-2 project at Johnson Space Center.

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The COLLIDE and CORE payloads are developed by UCF engineering students who are very excited for today launch.

"Many of our other methods of testing in microgravity only last a few seconds, but for this flight we will have about four minutes," Boehmer said. "These kinds of experiments help us learn about a variety of conditions still being actively researched, including the physics of early planetary formation and the conditions spacecraft need to expect, when traveling in low gravity places such as asteroids and small moons."
CONCLUTIONS

"I'm excited to watch it remotely," UCF engineering student Emily D’Elia, who worked on COLLIDE and visited the West Texas launch site last month, said in an interview.
Now with a new launch date set, D’Elia is back in Orlando and ready to watch a livestream of the experiments launching to space.

Principal investigator Dr. Josh Colwell, who leads the team of student researchers at UCF, is in Texas, where he'll watch the liftoff in person, and stick around to retrieve COLLIDE when it plunges back down to ground after its four-minute experiment. D’Elia expects payload recovery efforts to carry into the afternoon.

"The next steps will be to analyze the data and look for ways to improve our experiments," Boehmer said.

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