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Space Shuttle STS-127 Endeavour Space Station Assembly 2J/A JEM EF -

Space Shuttle STS-127 Endeavour Space Station Assembly 2J/A JEM EF por Jeff Quitney   6 anos atrás

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"STS-127 Post Flight Presentation (Narrated)
Commander: Mark L. Polansky
Pilot: Douglas G. Hurley
Mission Specialists: Christopher J. Cassidy, Thomas H. Marshburn, David A. Wolf, Julie Payette
Space Station Crew: (Down) Koichi Wakata, (Up) Timothy L. Kopra
Dates: July 15-31, 2009
Vehicle: Endeavour "

NASA film JSC-2287

Originally a public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-127
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

STS-127 (ISS assembly flight 2J/A) was a NASA Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS). It was the twenty-third flight of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The primary purpose of the STS-127 mission was to deliver and install the final two components of the Japanese Experiment Module: the Exposed Facility (JEM EF), and the Exposed Section of the Experiment Logistics Module (ELM-ES). When Endeavour docked with the ISS on this mission in July 2009, it set a record for the most humans in space at the same time in the same vehicle, the first time thirteen people have been at the station at the same time. It also tied the record of thirteen people in space at any one time.

The first launch attempt, on 13 June 2009, was scrubbed due to a gaseous hydrogen leak observed during tanking. The Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate (GUCP) on the external fuel tank experienced a potentially hazardous hydrogen gas leak similar to the fault that delayed the Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-119 in March 2009. Since a launch date of 18 June 2009 would have conflicted with the launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)/Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), NASA managers discussed the scheduling conflict with both the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter project and the Air Force Eastern Range, which provides tracking support for rockets launched from Florida. A decision was made to allow the shuttle to attempt a second launch on 17 June 2009, allowing LRO to launch on 18 June 2009.

The second launch attempt on 17 June 2009 was also scrubbed due to hydrogen leak issues seen from the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate. Due to conflicts with the launch of the LRO, and due to a beta angle constraint, the next available launch opportunity was scheduled for 11 July 2009. A successful tanking test for leak checks was performed on 1 July 2009, with modified GUCP seals allowing launch preparations to proceed as scheduled. Because of lightning strikes near the launch pad during the evening of 10 July 2009, NASA scrubbed the launch for the third time and rescheduled for 12 July 2009. Due to a Return To Launch Site (RTLS) weather violation, NASA scrubbed the launch for the fourth time on the evening of 12 July 2009.

STS-127's fifth launch attempt, on 13 July 2009, was also scrubbed due to anvil clouds and lightning within 10 nautical miles (19 km) of the launch site, which violated launch safety rules. STS-127 finally launched successfully on its sixth launch attempt, on 15 July 2009 at 18:03 EDT. Pieces of foam were observed falling off of the External Tank during launch, as had happened when the Space Shuttle Columbia was lost in 2003. However, in this instance, Endeavour only received minor scuffs to its heat shield, which were found to be of no concern to a safe reentry. The shuttle landed at Kennedy Space Center at 10:48 EDT on 31 July 2009, after a 16-day mission...

Endeavour carried a wide variety of equipment and cargo in the payload bay, with the largest item being the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM EF), and the Kibo Japanese Experiment Logistics Module -- Exposed Section (ELM-ES). The exposed facility is a part of Kibo that will allow astronauts to perform science experiments that are exposed to the vacuum of space. The exposed section is similar to the logistics module on the Kibo laboratory, but is not pressurized. Once its payloads were transferred to the JEM EF, the ELM-ES was returned to the payload bay.

Also inside the payload bay was a Integrated Cargo Carrier-Vertical Light Deployable (ICC-VLD), containing a variety of equipment and spare components for the station...

Two satellites were also carried by the orbiter, for deployment when the mission ended. The Dual Autonomous Global Positioning System On-Orbit Navigator Satellite, called DRAGONSAT, gathers data on autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking capabilities, and consists of two picosatellites, the AggieSat2, and PARADIGM (BEVO-1), which acquire GPS data from a device at NASA and send it to ground stations...

A second satellite, the Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE-2)... will measure the density and composition of the low Earth orbit atmosphere...

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